Saturday, October 11, 2014

Beloved Liberia
by Masnoh Wilson

Long time ago, once upon a time
You were a beacon of hope
For Black People everywhere
From all over the world people came
Because you were the place to be
But now you sit abandoned
Beaten down, weary, despised, neglected
Abused by us your own people
Who take you for granted
And have left you to die alone and rejected
Years of civil strife that did not have to be
Have plunged you into this abyss of darkness, sorrow and grief
And now Ebola is ravaging you, dead bodies everywhere
The pain so great, how can you bear?

And so your beloved children weep
We bawl, we moan, we sit forlorn
We wail, we grieve, and we cannot be comforted
For our beloved land is now a wasteland

But we remember your glory days
When you were THE PLACE to be
A land blessed with iron ore, diamonds, timber, rubber, and hydropower
Known for your beautiful beaches, lagoons, and rolling plains
Plateaus, mountains, and rich tropical rainforest

Aye Liberia, we weep for you
Please help us Lord
To do right by her
To love her, to cherish her
To cradle her, to heal her wounds
Just as a mother cradles her child
And loves that child, no matter what
Sacrificing her own life so that her child may live
May we love you Liberia in the same way

We Are The World - Michael Jackson Lionel Richie Cindy Lauper

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Here is a poem I wrote about a man who lived in New Haven in the 1800s. It is a work in progress, but I think it will make a good children's picture book as well. So everyone put your hands together for William Lanson:

William Lanson, An American Hero 

Did you know that back in the day
In New Haven long ago
Before you were born
Before I was born
Before your Mom or Dad  or
Grandpa and Grandma were even born

There lived a man in New Haven, Connecticut…
William Lanson was his name
A fine man they say
And a rich man too
Who did a lot for New Haven
And we don’t even have a clue

He was born a slave in Southington, Connecticut
Escaped slavery, came to New Haven
To make a life for himself, you see
He was a mason, a contractor
Yes, he was
And a businessman too

So back in the day
When Blacks were slaves
This man owned hotels and houses in
And around New Haven, that’s true
He was so smart, yes he was
He helped built the Long Wharf in New Haven, you know
So that ships could easily dock
Much the same like when cars need a space to park

But poor William Lanson
Despite who he was
Was harassed by the police sometimes
For no reason at all

They loved to punish him
For presumed “illegal activities”
Like breaking the law and some other stuff
But some people think it was only because
William Lanson happened to be Black!

So one day Mr. Lanson, because of harassment
Began to lose all the property he owned
One by one, they were taken away
And poor Mr. Lanson
Died a poor man!

Sad ending to a beautiful story I know
But lessons can be learned from each tale that is told
Never use power or status to bring down another, cause
We are brothers, no matter our color…
So let us learn from each other, and accept one another
For in the end, it’s all for the better!

Monday, May 20, 2013

I wrote this poem in Liberian English as an appeal to Liberians  and a call to action.  We've had a civil war and so now is the time to rebuild our country from the inside out...physically and psychologically.  We need lots of emotional healing in order to rebuild a strong and vibrant nation. So Liberian peepo, I beggin yor nah, leh us try...

Aye Liberian Peepo

by Masnoh Wilson
I say my Peepo
Leh kahn tork  dey plawa yeh
Yor know we fini fwetting dah ollor war deh
So nah aye tahn to hep fix dey country

Leh us stop all dey fwetting eh-mon oursefs
And stop all dis for nahtin tork
Aye whey nah carry us nowhere oooh
Aye whey  ownnay brin us down
So leh try to suppor each ollor efforts
To hep rebay our country!

We are good decent peepo dem
We know hah to werk har
We know hah to come together somtahns
Leh doway all dey tahn
We deh oldest country in Africa
Leh us show dey peepo out deh, weh we can do


We gah goo hart, Leh put it to goo use
So I bayg your oooh,
 Leh do sontin why we stay gah our breaff in us.

Dah all I gah to say oooh… yor tank you!!!!

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Lessons From Mom

I am re-posting a poem I wrote about my mother last year.  I had the honor of reading her this poem at a Senior Breakfast at Gateway Community College in May this year.  Everyone loved it and I hope you will too.  Please comment on my will help me become a better writer.:)

Lessons from Mom
By Masnoh Wilson
O my Ma…
She’s always telling, teaching, talking,
All the time, all the time
She makes me laugh so hard, you know
Because you see,
I’m a grown woman living miles away
Loving my life, doing my thing
But yet Mom is still calling and trying
To tell me what to do…
How to live, what to wear
And even how to fix my hair

So when I call
To say hello
And Mom starts her teaching thing
You should see me rolling my eyes
Switching my feet
Rocking my hips
Halfway holding the phone
Sighing to myself, while thinking of a reason
To end the call

But, her remedies for swollen feet
Gassy stomach and constipation
Aches in the joints and other places
Are all beginning to reverberate
Especially now that I’m entering
The second phase of my life on earth
Her advice on love
Marriage and child-rearing
That was always met with such resistance
Are all now becoming invaluable
Because as we all know
And have always known
Mothers are exceptional creatures…
Is there anything a mother doesn’t already know????

Friday, August 10, 2012

300 Million Strong

This poem was inspired by the speech President Obama made at the Memorial for the victims in the Gabby Gifford shooting.  I was so moved by the speech that I wrote the phrase 300 million strong in my notebook.  Days later, I started to write the poem…please comment after reading.  I would love to hear your thoughts… This was published in an online magazine recently ( and I’m now reposting.

300 Million Strong

By Masnoh Wilson

All around me, I see my family
300 million strong…
From all walks of life
And every nation on earth
From all seven continents combined
 Representing a family sublime
Divided by language, culture, color and creed
Yet trying our hardest to be
One Nation under God…
From all walks of life, my eyes behold
All God’s children,
Living and dwelling together as brethren

For we are not black nor white or yellow or red
We are humans of all shades of brown
The human race created by God
To bring forth
His Beauty, Glory
And Grace

The people here before us with their culture intact
Have influenced the way we interact
For no man lives to himself
And no man dies to himself
Our lives are intertwined
From the day we first exhale

So we are not a perfect union
Yet we must all strive to be
That one person who tries
To make life better
For others in the Family
Of 300 Million Strong

We are learning to live together,
Respecting each other,
Learning to be our brother’s keeper
While loving and helping one another
In this our family

300 million Strong
 Descendants of people
Who left the Old World
Some willingly, others unwilling,
To settle in the New
And somehow make it their own

The gifts they brought benefit us all
Every country, culture and tribe
Represented in these Great United States
Brought something to America
That can never
Be taken away, ever!

Yes, we know we are not a perfect union
But still we must all strive to be
That one person who try
To make life better for others
In this family of
300 Million Strong!!!!!

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Beautiful Me

This poem was inspired by some alarming tweets I read this morning filled with so many disparaging remarks
 about our physical features.  As Black people, we need to celebrate and show off the beauty we possess.  I decided to write through the eyes of a child so that our children can stop being ashamed of who they are!!!

Beautiful Me
By: Masnoh Wilson

Beautiful Me
Who told me so?
You already know

'Cause in me you see
Mankind indeed
For I begin with mahogany
And sometimes end with ecru

Doesn’t matter whether
My hair is tightly coiled,
Loosely curled
Or wavy straight

After all, I am the only one of course
Who can wear my hair 
So many ways, in so many styles
Whenever I want, whenever I please

Doesn’t matter that my nose is broad
a little bit wide
Or kinda narrow
Or almost straight

Doesn’t matter that my lips are big, brown
Or medium red
Or thin and pink
Or does it matter what you think?

This is no mystery you see
Cause my beauty honey 
Begins with me 
And ends with you!

Beautiful Me
I know I am
Who told me so?
You already know!